The Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato is a grand tourer sports car designed by Zagato and produced between 1960 and 1963. Introduced in October 1960 at the London Motor Show, it was effectively a DB4 GT, lightened and improved by the Zagato factory in Italy, by Ercole Spada.

Initially, the factory planned to produce 25 cars, but demand was not as strong as expected and production was reduced to 20.

The popularity of the original DB4 GT Zagato resulted in two subsequent waves of cars based on DB4s being rendered into "Zagatos" through the cooperation of Aston Martin and the Zagato works in Italy. They are known as "Sanction II" and "Sanction III" cars. Also, an unauthorised but lucrative private industry of modifying original DB4 GTs into "Zagato" replicas has arisen as well to meet market demand for high-quality Zagato recreations.

Specification
Engine
Although the specification of the engine was changed and upgraded throughout their racing history, the Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato predominantly featured a 3.7-litre aluminium twin-spark straight 6-cylinder engine with a 9.7:1 compression ratio, higher than the DB4 GT engine.

The engine produced 314 hp (234 kW), and had a 0 to 60 mph (97 km/h) acceleration of 6.1 seconds and a top speed of approximately 154 mph (248 km/h).

Body
Ercole Spada at Zagato transformed the DB4 GT into a smaller, more aerodynamic, super-lightweight car. Many steel components were replaced with the more lightweight and heat-resistant aluminium components. All non-essential elements disappeared, such as the bumpers. With the help of Perspex and aluminium components, more than 100 pounds (45 kg) was shed from the DB4 GT.

Racing history
Four of the original Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato's chassis, No.s 0191, 0193, 0182 (1 VEV) and 0183 (2 VEV), were built to a lightened DP207/209 specification especially for racing. The DP209 cars have a lower roofline, larger rear wings, a reshaped tail and a flatter, longer front end.

The first major race using an Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato was around Easter in 1961 at Goodwood. Driven by Stirling Moss, the car finished 3rd, behind an Aston Martin DB4 GT and the winning Ferrari 250 GT.

The most prominent DB4 GT Zagatos, affectionately known by the registration plates they share, 1 VEV and 2 VEV, were both raced under John Ogier's Essex Racing Stable, with assistance from the Aston Martin factory. Both the Zagatos raced in the 1961 24 Hours of Le Mans. However a repeat of the 1959 Le Mans victory was not to be, with both cars retiring. In July 1961 at a British Grand Prix Support race, the Zagato had its first victory with 2 VEV taking the last lap lead from a Jaguar E Type.

2 VEV crashed into a spa in 1962 and was rebuilt to the lightweight DP209 specification. After a car accident in 1993, the car was returned to the 1962 specification.

Chassis 0200 raced in the 1962 24 Hours of Le Mans; however, a blown piston after 9+1⁄2 hours forced the car to retire.

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