The Bentley R Type is the second series of post-war Bentley cars, replacing the Mark VI. Essentially, a larger boot version of the Mk VI, the R type is considered by some to be a loophole before the introduction of the S series cars in 1955. As in its predecessor, a standard body was available, as well as body versions by companies such as HJ Mulliner & Co., Park Ward, Harold Radford, Freestone and Webb, Carrosserie Worblaufen and others.

In addition to the radiator grills and carburetion, there was little difference between the standard Bentley R Type and the Rolls-Royce Silver Dawn. The R Type was the most popular brand, with about 2,500 units manufactured during the race for Silver Dawn's 760.

During development, it was referred to as the Bentley Mark VII; the chassis plates of these cars describe them as Bentley 7. The name R Type, which is now generally applied, derives from the RT series of chassis. The front of the saloon model was identical to the Mark VI, but the boot (trunk) was almost twice as large.  The engine displacement was approximately 4 ½ liters, according to the later versions of the Mark VI. 

An automatic choke was fitted to the R-type carburetor. The fixation of the rear springs to the chassis has been changed in detail between the VI mark and the R type.

For buyers looking for a more distinctive car, a decreasing number had custom bodies available from the ever-decreasing number of body builders in the UK. This ranged from the large flowing lines of the conservative, almost pre-war forms of Freestone and Webb, to the practical conversions of Harold Radford, which included a shell-style trunk and folding rear seats.

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